Living room.Front view of the property
Modern relaxing home from home.
Hosted by Jane
Jane is the host.
7 guests
4 bedrooms
7 beds
2 baths
7 guests
4 bedrooms
7 beds
2 baths
You won’t be charged yet

Cricket View Cottage was built in about 1870 and is located opposite Yorkshire's oldest cricket ground. It is quite and well appointed for all public transport and mins from the sea. Ideal for families or business travellers who want the comfort of a real home.

The space

The property has been completely newly refurbished over two floors. The living room is at the from of the property with new sofas and and armchairs as well as a TV. There are four bedrooms which can comfortably sleep seven. There are two bathrooms (one ensuite). There is a kitchen with all utilities and a light dinning room.

Guest access

Access via key safe access code

Interaction with guests

The property will be for the sole use of the guests. Should the guests have questions or require assistance there will be someone to hand.

Other things to note

EXPLORING REDCAR & COATHAM
PLACES TO GO and THINGS TO SEE

A WALKING TOUR OF REDCAR AND COATHAM

This walking tour of Coatham and Redcar takes about 2 hours without stops – but we are sure that you will want to visit some of the attractions, so it is a great way to spend a half day - and the stroll is (hopefully) not physically taxing.

Cricket View Cottage was built in about 1870 as the end of a four house terrace and later the house was extended. The houses on the left of Cricket View Cottage (numbers 82 and beyond) were added some thirty or forty years later.

When you leave Cricket View Cottage, facing you is the Redcar Cricket Club which dates back to the 1860s and it claims to be the oldest cricket ground in continual use in the whole of Yorkshire. On Match Days (Sunday afternoons) the cricket is well worth watching – but being supporters, we may be slightly biased! The cricket club bar is open every evening and visitors (including you) are welcome. On either side of the cricket field are two grand terraces of mid-Victorian villas, Nelson and Trafalgar Terraces, which were built soon after the cricket club was established.

Turn right along Coatham Road and on your right is The Lobster public house. The Lobster is one of the oldest pubs in the town and recommended for a well kept pint of Sam Smith’s “Old Brewery” Bitter. Opposite The Lobster take the first road to your left – Trafalgar Terrace – and at the far end of Trafalgar Terrace turn right into Kirkleatham Street.

Some 30 yards along Kirkleatham Street to the left is “The Red Barns” – once a hotel, but now closed. Formerly this was the family home of the famous Middle East explorer and diplomat, Gertrude Bell, and the blue plaque on the wall records this. The house was designed by the equally famous William Morris for Gertrude Bell’s father, who was the Managing Director of one of the great iron works in Middlesbrough and the mayor of that borough when the Transporter Bridge was opened. The design of Red Barns owes much to Mr. Morris’ own house in Eltham, South East London, known as “The Red House”.

Continuing along Kirkleatham Street, turn right into any one of the streets of fine terraced Victorian villas and when you reach Coatham Road, turn left and just a few paces along and to your left is the entrance to Christ Church. This is the Church of England Parish Church and was dedicated in 1856. It is well worth a visit – and if you are minded to attend of a Sunday they are most welcoming to visitors. In the churchyard see the War Graves and those of the merchant seamen, including members of the crew of “The Birger”, of which more below.

Straight across Coatham Road from Christ Church is Church Street (rather obvious!) and this leads into High Street West – also known locally as Coatham High Street. The houses on the landward side of the street are an eclectic mixture and are a good sample of the styles of North Country domestic architecture from about the late sixteenth century through to the early twentieth century. Turn right and walk along High Street West and at the town end of High Street West, on the left, is The Cleveland, a large Victorian pub, again worth a recommendation, not only for keeping good beer but for having real live music a couple of evenings of the week.

At the eastern end of High Street West turn left onto Newcomen Terrace. On your right is The Scared Heart Church – the RC Parish Church – and again they welcome visitors who wish to worship there on a Sunday. A little further on, to the left, was the Coatham Bowl, which was famous in the sixties and seventies as a “venue” and many famous bands played there in its heyday, and later it was the local sports and activity centre. It fell upon sad times and was demolished in 2014. Facing the site of the former Bowl is the Boating Lake, built in the 1930s and restored in Summer 2009. On the far side the Boating Lake is Tune In, a youth media and activity centre and the Mungle Jungle – a skateboard park.(URL HIDDEN)Beyond is Coatham Beach, which in addition to the usual seaside pleasures, also provides an early morning training track for the local horse racing stables at Great Ayton. Between the Coatham village and the beach is Coatham Common, which for many years was part of the Cleveland Golf Course. In 2001 the Redcar Council decided that the Common was to be sold for housing development and their tenants, the Golf Club, had to re-locate to a new clubhouse nearby. However, the development scheme was strongly opposed by the residents of Coatham and it bit the dust in 2010 when the Supreme Court ruled that the land was a Common and as a result it could not be built on.

On the far side of the Common, on Majuba Road, you will find the Cleveland Golf Club, said to be the oldest links course in England - and visiting golfers are encouraged to try their skills. Beyond the golf course are the Coatham Dunes, which are a protected as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and beyond that are the (now closed) blast furnaces of Redcar Steel Works. To the right of the steel works – and extending about a mile out to sea - is the South Gare, the seawall that protects the outflow of the River Tees into the North Sea.

Returning to the Boating Lake on Newcomen Terrace, as you proceed along the new sea defences, you will see the Bandstand – opened in 2008 as the result of the efforts of a group of civically minded citizens - and it is unique for being the first solar powered bandstand in the world! Band concerts are given here regularly during the summer season. And of course, you will be delighted by our family of municipal penguins who live on the walkway adjoining the bandstand.

A further 100 yards along Newcomen Terrace, on the left and backing on to the sea, is the Regent Cinema. Originally this was the entrance to Coatham Pier but after the pier fell into disuse and was dismantled it became a cinema. In 2007 the movie “Atonement” was made on the adjoining beach and the cinema featured in the film, too. Indeed, the first showing of the movie in the North of England was at that very cinema!

Straight across Coatham Road from Christ Church is Church Street (rather obvious!) and this leads into High Street West – also known locally as Coatham High Street. The houses on the landward side of the street are an eclectic mixture and are a good sample of the styles of North Country domestic architecture from about the late sixteenth century through to the early twentieth century. Turn right and walk along High Street West and at the town end of High Street West, on the left, is The Cleveland, a large Victorian pub, again worth a recommendation, not only for keeping good beer but for having real live music a couple of evenings of the week.

At the eastern end of High Street West turn left onto Newcomen Terrace. On your right is The Scared Heart Church – the RC Parish Church – and again they welcome visitors who wish to worship there on a Sunday. A little further on, to the left, was the Coatham Bowl, which was famous in the sixties and seventies as a “venue” and many famous bands played there in its heyday, and later it was the local sports and activity centre. It fell upon sad times and was demolished in 2014. Facing the site of the former Bowl is the Boating Lake, built in the 1930s and restored in Summer 2009. On the far side the Boating Lake is Tune In, a youth media and activity centre and the Mungle Jungle – a skateboard park.(URL HIDDEN)Beyond is Coatham Beach, which in addition to the usual seaside pleasures, also provides an early morning training track for the local horse racing stables at Great Ayton. Between the Coatham village and the beach is Coatham Common, which for many years was part of the Cleveland Golf Course. In 2001 the Redcar Council decided that the Common was to be sold for housing development and their tenants, the Golf Club, had to re-locate to a new clubhouse nearby. However, the development scheme was strongly opposed by the residents of Coatham and it bit the dust in 2010 when the Supreme Court ruled that the land was a Common and as a result it could not be built on.

On the far side of the Common, on Majuba Road, you will find the Cleveland Golf Club, said to be the oldest links course in England - and visiting golfers are encouraged to try their skills. Beyond the golf course are the Coatham Dunes, which are a protected as a Site of Special Scientific Interest, and beyond that are the (now closed) blast furnaces of Redcar Steel Works. To the right of the steel works – and extending about a mile out to sea - is the South Gare, the seawall that protects the outflow of the River Tees into the North Sea.

Returning to the Boating Lake on Newcomen Terrace, as you proceed along the new sea defences, you will see the Bandstand – opened in 2008 as the result of the efforts of a group of civically minded citizens - and it is unique for being the first solar powered bandstand in the world! Band concerts are given here regularly during the summer season. And of course, you will be delighted by our family of municipal penguins who live on the walkway adjoining the bandstand.

A further 100 yards along Newcomen Terrace, on the left and backing on to the sea, is the Regent Cinema. Originally this was the entrance to Coatham Pier but after the pier fell into disuse and was dismantled it became a cinema. In 2007 the movie “Atonement” was made on the adjoining beach and the cinema featured in the film, too. Indeed, the first showing of the movie in the North of England was at that very cinema!


Continuing along the Sea Front, Newcomen Terrace becomes The Esplanade and the principal feature is the vertical pier - The Redcar Beacon. This five storey tower has a viewing platform with a superb seaward view of Tees Bay, complete with the inevitable queue of ships waiting to enter TeesPort: The sixth busiest port in the UK - Not to mention the ugly turbine towers of the off-shore wind farm. Looking west across the Bay and beyond the turbines you can see Hartlepool on the other side of the Tees - and on a clear day you can even see as far as the tower blocks at Roker in Sunderland.

Beyond the Redcar Beacon there are the slipways through the recently heightened sea-wall that are used by our local fishing fleet. As Redcar does not have a harbour the fishing boats operate from the beach and as a result many of them are of the traditional flat bottomed design known as “Yorkshire Cobbles”. Incidently, the “harbour” for the boats is some 150 yards inland at Fisherman’s Square – just beyond the Parish Church! At the eastern end of The Esplanade is the anchor of “The Birger”, a frigate that was wrecked off just the shore in late Victorian days, and the crew of which, who perished, are buried at Coatham Church.

On the inland side The Esplanade has all the traditional shops and attractions that you would expect to find in a seaside resort – fish and chip shops, amusement arcades, and ice cream parlours. Nearby, there is the new municipal pleasure palace, The Hub and further along, on the corner of The Esplanade and Clarendon Street is the Zetland Lifeboat Museum, which houses the oldest working lifeboat in the world, dating from 1802, and although long retired it is still seaworthy.

At the Lifeboat Museum turn right into Clarendon Street and make your way to Redcar High Street. Cross the High Street and continue south for about thirty yards and at the roundabout turn right. On the left hand corner of the next junction (Lord Street), is St. Peter’s Church. This is Redcar’s Parish Church, built in 1842. It contains some interesting memorials and is usually open for visitors, as well as serving a very drinkable cup of coffee!

Return back to the High Street and at the roundabout turn left and walk along High Street. This is the main shopping street in town and the western end is pedestrianised. It has the full range of shops and banks as well as several thriving outside street stalls. However, we must point out that there are no supermarkets – those are located about 100 yards further inland and adjoining the railway line.

At the western end of High Street is the Town Clock. The clock and tower were originally intended to be a Memorial to Queen Victoria, but because of a few delays (yes, they happened in those days, too!) it was not completed until about 1910, so instead it was dedicated to King Edward VII, who was well thought of locally as he was a regular and enthusiastic visitor to Redcar Racecourse. Just beyond the Clock, to the left, is Inshore Fisheries, recommended for fresh fish and seafood: Their slogan is “If it swims, it slims”.

Proceed forward along High Street to the cross roads with Station Road, turn left and then right at the next cross roads, and you will be back on Coatham Road. As you walk back along Coatham Road you will pass on your left the Coatham Memorial Hall, the Redcar Town Hall and the new Leisure Centre and Swimming Pool.

A few yards further on and to your left is the War Memorial and on the opposite side of the road is the Memorial Garden. The Garden was opened in 2000 on a then vacant site to record the night in 1941 when a bomb fell on the club that formerly stood on the site killing a number of Borough Councillors who had come over from the former Redcar Town Hall to take shelter there during an air raid. The garden also has memorials to others who served and died in the First and Second World Wars and other conflicts.

Other Places of Interest IN REDCAR

Redcar Race Course. This is one of the best racecourses in the North East of England and on Race Days there is always a full and competitive programme. Not only does Redcar attract the finest talent of our famous North Eastern racing stables, it is a showcase for our local stables at Great Ayton, and they regularly train their horses on Coatham Beach. Naturally, all the necessary facilities are provided and you can make a day of it and have lunch at the Course before the start of the first race. You can walk from Cricket View Cottage to the Racecourse in about 15 minutes - Turn left out of Cricket View Cottage and walk along Coatham Road to the second set of traffic lights: Turn right and cross the railway at the level crossing and continue to the roundabout, turn left there and the entrance to the race course is on your right. And if you fancy a punt on the ponies … Good Luck.

If you are golfer, we recommend the Cleveland Golf Club – the oldest Links Course in England, although our Scottish friends often remind us that they have some Golf Links that are far longer established! The Golf Club is about 10 minutes walk away – Turn right at the front door and walk along Coatham Road to Church Street, turn right and then left on to High Street West. At the western end of High Street West, turn right on to Majuba Road and the entrance to the Club is about 50 yards along. Visiting golfers are very welcome and the native golfers are a friendly crew. There are other three other good Golf Clubs who welcome visiting players within a reasonable putting distance from Cricket View Cottage – they are at Saltburn, Wilton and Hunley (just south of Saltburn).

Alternatively, if you want a really bumper breathe of sea air you can take a run out to The South Gare. This breakwater, which goes about a mile out to sea, was built in the 1850s to regulate the flow of the River Tees. Head right from Cricket View Cottage, past Christ Church, and at the roundabout keep ahead. You will pass through Warrenby, once a village but now the town’s designated light industrial zone, and at the end of the “village” turn right at the roundabout and across the abandoned railway crossing and follow the road for about a mile and a half. On your left are the (now closed) blast furnaces of Redcar Steel Works, but to your right are the Coatham Dunes - a protected Nature Reserve for seabirds. However, as you go further along the road, be aware that it narrows as it passes between the dunes. At the far end of the road the dunes drop away to reveal the spectacular view to the east: Here you can see the whole of the Tees Bay along to Huntcliff (about 8 miles away). On the left, do not miss Paddy’s Hole – our quirky local “marina”. At the north end of the South Gare there is adequate parking and fine sea views.

Another local trip that we recommend is to the village of Kirkleatham, where you can see the ancient Sir William Turner’s Alms Houses (who hold occasional classical music concerts), a fine old church and the Kirkleatham Museum, with its collection of 7th century Anglo-Saxon treasures that were found at nearby Loftus and The Pavilion @ Kirkleatham – for events at The Pavilion, check the local listings guide. To get to Kirkleatham, leave Cricket View Cottage and drive along Coatham Road, past Christ Church and turn left at the roundabout, cross the railway bridge, and go straight ahead at the traffic lights. Follow the main road out of town and Kirkleatham Village is signposted about a mile along on your left.

BEYOND REDCAR TOWN
BY Car OR PUBLIC TRANSPORT

Almost all of these places can be reached by frequent bus or train services from Redcar

At the east end of Redcar Town Centre the main road along the bay goes along The Stray, an area of open land on top of the cliffs and the beach - and there is a good café at the town end of The Stray.

At the far end of The Stray is Marske, a long established, quaint inshore fishing village. To see old Marske, turn left off the main road just at the left hand side of “The Ship” and follow through to the car parking in the valley, from where you can walk down to the beach. A special attraction in Markse is Winkie’s Castle, on the left just beyond The Ship. This lovingly preserved cruck cottage is stuffed with a collection of artefacts amassed by the local cobbler and the cottage and the contents tell the history of the village. If any further recommendation to stop here is required, we note that the village has three decent taverns: The Ship (or the Lower House), The Clarendon (the Middle House) and The Zetland (the Upper House) – and The Zetland is recommended by CAMRA - and the restaurant is good, too.

About three miles further south of Marske is Saltburn by the Sea – This town is a Victorian Jewel. Originally Old Saltburn was no more than a collection of fisherman’s cottages down by the Burn but in 1864 the main town on the cliff was created when the railway was extended from Redcar. An enterprising group of entrepreneurs headed by Henry Pease, the son of the Quaker gentleman who inspired the building of the Stockton and Darlington Railway in the 1820s, created a town in what was previously a meadow. Naturally, being a railway town, the Railway Station was at the centre of the town and it was handsomely designed. Although the trains now stop in a new station a few yards outside the former station, the original station has been preserved and the buildings now are home to a selection of shops, offices and cafes. Being canny entrepreneurs Mr Pease and the developers also swiftly built the Zetland Hotel, adjoining the original station – probably one of the first Railway Hotels in the land - and with superb views over the bay. Sadly, the hotel has now been converted to apartments.

The rest of Saltburn was deliberately laid out as a high class residential town. In particular, note the streets between the railway and the Upper Esplanade which were named after precious stones – Amber, Coral, Diamond, Emerald, Garnet, Pearl and Ruby. The founder of the town, Mr Peace, being a proper Quaker man, took his inspiration for those street names from the Book of Revelation, and later it was inevitable that they soon became known as “The Jewel Streets”. To complete their grand design, the developers ran a grand parade around the cliff top.

Saltburn has retained its Victorian elegance and this is particularly reflected in the quality of the shops along Milton Street, where many of the wrought iron and glass covers over the pavement/sidewalk have been retained. In this upper part of town there is a very good specialist delicatessen - Real Meals on Milton Street and a good selection of restaurants: Allesi’s and Virgo’s, both on Dundas Street, and Whistlestop next to the station, are highly recommended.

Other specialist establishments worthy of your patronage are Chocolatini on the corner of Windsor Road – a veritable orgy of anything made of chocolate and the Saltburn Bookshop on Amber Street, which is as good a second hand bookseller as you could wish for. However, the ‘not to be missed’ attraction is The Arts Bank on Milton Street. This former bank has been converted into five floor showcase for the local creative talent, where painters, potters and graphic artists exhibit and sell their creations. Our final commercial note directs you to the Saltburn Farmer’s Market, which is held on the second Saturday of each summer month – August excepted.

Saltburn is town of two halves and the main road descends the cliff from the upper town to the Lower Esplanade by a fiercely twisting descent. On the way down The Bank note Teddy’s Nook to the left – This house was built by Mr Pease, which was later let it to Lily Langtree, the actress and mistress of Edward, the Prince of Wales. Opposite Teddy’s Nook, on the right, there is a decent watering hole: The Spa - and their cuisine may be enjoyed in the glass covered conservatory that has a superb view over the bay to Huntcliff. At the bottom of the Bank there is another good eating house, the “Vista de Mar” which has a large balcony overlooking the sea.

However, many visitors prefer to descend the cliff from the town to the sea on the venerable hydraulic Cliff Railway, opened on 28th June 1884, which makes it Britain’s oldest water balanced cliff lift. The passenger cars have been recently restored to their Victorian glory and the service operates between Easter and the end of September – albeit at a modest charge. At the lower terminal is Saltburn Pier, the most northerly surviving pleasure pier in England, as well as a range of seaside refreshment outlets (the fish and chip shop is a local legend) and as Saltburn Bay has excellent surfing, this is the place to hire your surfing gear from the surfing shop.

Continuing along the Lower Promenade and just beyond the bridge over the burn, and to your right, is the other railway station in Saltburn – In summer, from here a miniature railway chugs up the valley to the Valley Gardens. At the far end of the Lower Promenade is The Ship tavern, which is all that remains of Old Saltburn. During the Napoleonic Wars Saltburn was a noted smuggling centre and legend has it that The Ship was at the centre of the trade. These days The Ship is still well noted, but for the quality of the food served in their bar and the restaurant – the locally caught crab is their seasonal speciality. Opposite to The Ship on the landward side is a small building that was for many years the Saltburn Morgue and it is hoped to restore that building as a visitor attraction.

From The Ship, leave Saltburn by the main road and head through Loftus to Skiningrove. Just beyond Skiningrove, after you have passed the steel works and gone under the high railway bridge, you descend the twisting curves and at the bottom of the bank to the left is the road that leads to the Cleveland Iron Mining Museum – an excellent attraction that tells the story of the local iron mining industry - and further along the road is the seaside village where many of the iron miners lived. For the energetic, the Museum is the start of the 18 mile long Redcar and Cleveland Ironstone Trail.

About five miles inland from Redcar is the ancient market town of Guisborough – so old that it even gets mention in the Domesday Book! The principal feature is the 12th century Priory, now ruined but still beautiful, set in a fine and well kept park and the Priory has an outdoor summer theatre. The Main Street, complete with a selection of old and good public houses and tea rooms, comes alive on Market Days - Thursdays and Saturdays - but car parking can be a touch difficult. For a treat, take lunch, afternoon tea or dinner at Guisborough Hall, the family seat of Lord Guisborough, on the edge of the town – or relax in their Luxury Spa. Just outside of Guisborough, at Pinchinthorpe, is the Guisborough Forest and Branch Walkway, and a short stroll will take you to Highcliffe Nab and the Hanging Stone.

The iconic feature of Cleveland is Roseberry Topping, a 1051 foot high hill with curiously sharply angled slopes, which is to be found a couple of miles west of Guisborough. The very name of the hill links the present to the Viking connection with the area as it is said that the name is derived from the Old Norse – “topping” comes from “toppen” – a hill.

A few miles further west is Great Ayton, which was the boyhood home of Captain James Cook, who as we all recall was quite an accomplished traveller – after all he discovered Australia! This quaint stone built village even has beck flowing down the middle it and is well worth a visit.

A Special Note for Walkers

One of the great advantages of Cleveland is that it has lots of hills and moors and that attracts walkers. Also, Redcar is very convenient for the North York Moors National Park, which offers a myriad of walking opportunities. The most famous walking route is The Cleveland Way and access can be made to it at Saltburn. However, we have a local alternative – the Redcar and Cleveland Ironstone Trail. This 18 mile long walk winds its well signposted way over the Moors from Skinningrove to Eston and tells the story of the local once very active iron industry. Start from either Eston or Skinningrove – both towns have a frequent and regular bus service to and from Redcar.

SOME IDEAS FOR A Day trip
FROM CRICKET VIEW COTTAGE

To the South

We left off our travels to the south of Redcar at the Cleveland Ironstone Museum at Skinningrove, and a little further south the A174 passes through Boulby, on the southern boundary of the Borough of Redcar and Cleveland, and to the west is Boulby Mine, the deepest potash mine in the world. About a mile and a half further south is Hindewell and there the road to the left of the village winds down to Runswick Bay – a charming old fishing village: Park at the village entrance (fee payable) and wander about. Refreshment is available at the Royal York Hotel. Continuing south on the main coast road you will pass through several attractive villages before descending the bank (and take great care on The Bank!) into Sandsend, a small and traditional seaside village, before reaching Whitby.

Whitby is one of the jewels in Yorkshire’s crown, and is a town of history and legend, not to mention its most famous fictional visitor – Dracula. The ruined Abbey, a 12th century monastery, presides over the town. The present ruined building occupies the site of its 6th century predecessor, founded by St Hilda, which was the location for the Synod of Whitby in 667AD and the home of the first English hymn writer, Caedmon. Adjoining the Abbey is a fine early 18th century mansion house with a detailed exhibit telling the story of the greatness of the former Abbey. A few yards away is the 17th century Parish Church, much of it built from stone plundered from the ancient abbey and with some wonderful box-pews and a pulpit in the middle of the chancel.

From the Abbey 199 steps descend to the town and at the foot of the steps visit the Duke of York tavern, with a great view over the river and the harbour. The old town is made up of cobbled streets, quaint gift shops – particularly, look for Whitby Jet - and tearooms and in the centre is the Market Place. The bridge over the River Esk leads to the main quay, the principal shopping streets and the railway station. A stroll along the Quay takes you to the foot of the Khyber Pass (the road up through the cliff) - and at the top of the Khyber Pass see the arch of whalebones dedicated to Captain James Cook, who started his maritime career on coal carriers working out of Whitby.

An alternative road route from Redcar to Whitby is over the Moorland Road (A171) through the North York Moors National Park.

A third way to Whitby is by train - Take a local train from Redcar to Middlesbrough and change to one of the four services each day along the Esk Valley Line.

The Esk Valley Line connects at Grosmont with the North Yorks Moors Railway, one of the longest preserved railways in the UK, and a haven of steam powered travel. There are plentiful refreshment facilities at Grosmont, Goathland and Pickering railway stations, as well as on the actual trains. Goathland is also worth a visit if you are a fan of the tv show “Heartbeat” – the village was transformed into “Akenfield”.


To the West

Take the A174 from Redcar westwards to the junction with the A19 South and about 10 miles south at Mount Grace Priory, the last Carthusian monastery to be founded in England in 1392. , See the restored monk’s cells and the Jacobean mansion house restored in the late 19th century by William Morris - and some 5 miles further along the A19 is the lovely little Leake Church.

Deviating off the A19 – but only by a few miles in each case – are Stokesley, a beautifully kept Georgian/Victorian market town [Market Day is Friday], Northallerton, the county town of North Yorkshire, and Thirsk, another market town, which has the added attraction of the “World of James Herriot”, based on the famous tv series.

Other destinations along the A19 include York - with the great Minster, the medieval walled city, the Jorvik Centre (a reconstruction of Viking “Jorvik”) and the National Railway Museum – and the Yorkshire Dales – where we recommend visiting the Wensleydale Railway (from Leeming Bar on the A1 to Redmire via Bedale) and Hawes, the home of Wensleydale cheese.

Up the Tees Valley

Call in at Middlesbrough and see - and ride on - the famous Transporter Bridge, opened in 1912, before heading up river to Stockton and the Tees Barrage. Further up-river is Darlington, a real old fashioned Northern Town – See St Cuthbert’s Church and North Road Station, a railway museum and the birthplace of the recently built – new - steam locomotive “Tornado”.

West of Darlington and further up the Tees Valley is the waterfall at High Force.

Some six miles west of Darlington is the old market town of Barnard Castle and the Bowes Museum – a treasure house of collections of fine art and artefacts rivalling the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and housed in a 19th century chateau.

To the North

Just across the Tees Bay from Redcar, 3 miles as the crow flies, is Hartlepool. However, we humans have to go a longer way around the bay – The shortest way is via Middlesbrough and the Transporter Bridge. At Hartlepool, visit the Quay – for the large outlet centre, the collection of restored buildings and the last working Royal Navy sailing ship, “Trincomali”.

It is only about a 30 minute road journey to Durham - or you can take the train from Redcar, with a change at Darlington. Durham is a fairytale city. The great Cathedral, dedicated to St. Cuthbert and containing the tombs of the Venerable Bede and Cardinal Prince Bishop de Langley (reigned (PHONE NUMBER HIDDEN)), and the University, are set high on a hill and surrounded by an old town that gently tumbles down the hill to the Market Square. Also see the Prebend’s Bridge.

Between Durham and Newcastle on Tyne is Beamish - a giant open-air museum containing a small town of houses, shops and other building collected from all parts of the North East of England, as well as a pre-First World War I working farm, a coalmine, a mining village and two working railways (one being a copy of the original Stockton and Darlington Railway). The whole complex is served by its own internal electric street tramway using preserved cars. Despite the size of the museum it is designed to accommodate disabled visitors as well as the able bodied.

Newcastle on Tyne can be easily reached from Redcar – about an hour by road … or by train - again change trains at Darlington. Visit the Quay, see the famous Tyne Bridge, St Nicholas’ Cathedral, Eldon Square, the Bigg Market and St James’ Park, the home of Newcastle FC.

The Tyne Valley

Journey up the Tyne Valley to visit George Stephenson’s Birthplace at Wylam, and that of Thomas Bewick, “Nature’s Engraver”, nearby at Sunnyside, just outside of Eltringham (north of Prudhoe), before making your way to Hexham, where you can visit both saints and sinners at Hexham Abbey and the Border Reever’s Museum, respectively.

The Northumberland Coast and Alnwick.

Take the A1 north from Newcastle to Alnwick Castle, the seat of the Dukes of Northumberland. The Castle is famed for its gardens and tree-top walk as well as being used for the “externals” of Hogwart’s School in the Harry Potter movies. Alternatively, you can take the Coastal Route through Seahouses and see the Farne Islands before reaching Bamburgh – and its castle.

However, and whichever route you take, you must visit Lindisfarne, the Holy Island – but check the tide times before you leave Redcar as access to Holy Island is only allowed over the Causeway and the road is closed for about four hours at High Tide.


Amenities
Kitchen
Internet
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Prices
Extra people $20 NZD / night after the first guest
Cleaning Fee $78 NZD
Weekly Discount: 10%
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Sleeping arrangements
Bedroom 1
1 queen bed
Bedroom 2
1 queen bed
Bedroom 3
2 single beds
Bedroom 4
1 single bed

House Rules
No smoking
No parties or events
Check in time is 3PM - 7PM
Check out by 10AM

Cancellations

Safety features
Smoke detector
Carbon monoxide detector
First aid kit
Fire extinguisher

Availability
On Fridays and Saturdays the minimum stay is 2 nights.

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Dave User Profile
October 2017
This lovely, spacious and cosy house more than met our expectations. It was roomier than it appears on the outside. Everything was just perfect. The location couldn’t have been better for the town, the Races and the railway station and, of course, the sea front. We can’t fault the place!

Steve User Profile
September 2017
Lovely comfortable relaxing house, very clean, modern well equipped home, that was perfect for a few days there, would have been nice to have been there longer. Very handy for the town and beach. Highly recommended.

Jane User Profile
September 2017
Really spacious lovely home close to town park etc. Nice little garden with off road parking. Spotlessly clean and comfy beds - what more could anyone want. Would definitely recommend although I don't really want too many people to know about this place in case we can't get in next time!!

Michelle User Profile
August 2017
Lovely house, great location, helpful host. Parking behind house and in back garden. Highly recommended. Fantastic in every way.

Jayne User Profile
August 2017
Booker beware. The owner cancelled our booking. This accommodation may be offered on more than one site. This is the explanation I was given. Unfortunately Jane did not manage her booking diary effectively and 48 hrs before we were due to arrive she cancelled our booking as she had overbooked the property. I am not sure who booked earliest but my booking was cancelled.I booked at the beginning of June for an August stay. I am sure the property is as good as it looks. The stress caused by this cancellation cannot really be recompensed by the full refund and I would advise caution if booking the property- ask Jane to check her other web listings to ensure that she has not accepted a booking on the dates that you require. I have to take her explanation at face value that this was the 1st occurrence and she was truly sorry and had tried to source alternative arrangements for me to no avail. It has unfortunately left me less than confident in both the owner and Airbnb. I do not like leaving negative feedback but on this occasion I feel I must make others aware that there has been a breach of client care especially as the feedback was what persuaded me to book the cottage in the first instance. A very sad and disappointed booker.

Ian User Profile
July 2017
The house was very well equipped and clean. It certainly met all our expectations There were all the shopping basics in the kitchen. It was great to arrive and be able to make a cup of coffee. A bonus was being able to hang out washing! The house was certainly big enough to entertain our Redcar extended family. Off street parking at the rear was ideal. A great central location able to walk to shops, restaurants etc. Would definitely recommend.

Lynn User Profile
July 2017
Jane's home was very comfortable with all the amenities needed, would highly recommend this home.

London, United KingdomJoined in February 2017
Jane User Profile

This is a family home when we are in Coatham. A real home from home for our guests to enjoy

Response rate: 75%
Response time: within a day

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