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Flat in PARIS CENTER- LE MARAIS
Flat in PARIS CENTER- LE MARAIS
2 guests
1 bedroom
1 bed
1 bath
2 guests
1 bedroom
1 bed
1 bath

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In the heart of the marsh, historic apartment located in the street of bad boys. The apartment is modern equipped beams are visible. It is very authentic.
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Au cœur du marais, appartement historique situé dans la rue des mauvais garçons.
L'appartement est moderne équipé les poutres sont apparentes. Il est très authentique.

The space

CHARMING APARTMENT IN THE HISTORIC MARAIS! ! ! It is a charming studio located in the heart of the marsh. You will be able to live like a Parisian and enjoy the small neighborhood shops. It has been recently renovated, very spacious and functional and mostly modern. It is fully equipped and has everything you need. You have at your disposal: - washer and dryer - fridge - microwave - Cooking - Internet District : Subway: City Hall For the little story : Le Marais is a historic (and non-administrative) Parisian district, located in part of the 3rd and 4th arrondissements of Paris, on the right bank of the Seine. It is now bounded on the west by the rue Beaubourg, on the east by Boulevard Beaumarchais, on the north by the Rue de Bretagne, and on the south by the Seine. The Marais is an old swamp area occupied since the twelfth century by religious orders, including the Order of the Temple, which set up establishments there. At the beginning of the seventeenth century, as a result of the construction of the Place des Vosges, this district, until then peripheral, became the residence of the Parisian nobility. Many private homes are built there, many of which remain today. In the middle of the eighteenth century the district was deserted by the Parisian elite in favor of the Faubourg Saint-Honore and the Faubourg Saint-Germain, which offered more space. The French Revolution ended the hunting of wealthy owners. The neighborhood is then occupied by a population of craftsmen and workers who occupy the old hotels and built workshops in the old inner courtyards. The large nineteenth-century Paris construction work has little effect on the neighborhood, which keeps its narrow streets, but many quality buildings are being gradually destroyed. In 1969, André Malraux launched a conservation and preservation program that continues today. The preserved area is now, thanks to its beautiful buildings, frequented by tourists and sought after by the well-to-do classes. Many museums are located there. Several communities have been formed over the years: Ashkenazi Jews at the end of the nineteenth century, Chinese after the First World War, and homosexuals. History: Paris aristocratic district In 1240 the Order of the Temple built its fortified church just outside Paris's walls, in the northern part of the Marais. The Holy Cross, the Holy Cross, the Holy Cross, the Holy Cross, the Holy Cross, and the Carmelite Convent. Of the Val-des-Écoliers. During the mid-thirteenth century, Charles I of Anjou, King of Naples and Sicily, and brother of King Louis IX of France built his residence near the current No. 7 rue de Sévigné. In 1361 the King Charles, built in the 19th century. From this time to the 17th century and especially after the Royal Square (Place Royale, current place des Vosges) was designed under King Henry IV in 1605, the Marais was the noble favorite place of residence. The Hotel de Sully, the Hôtel de Beauvais, the Hotel Carnavalet, the Hôtel de Guénégaud, and the Hôtel de Soubise. Jewish community [edit] After the nobility began to move to the Faubourg Saint-Germain, the district became a popular and active commercial area, hosting one of Paris' main Jewish communities. At the end of the 19th century and during the first half of the 20th, the district around the Rosiers Street, referred to as the "Pletzl", welcomed many Eastern European Jews (Ashkenazi) who reinforced the district's clothing specialization. But, during World War II the Jewish community was targeted by the Nazis who were occupying France. The street of the Rosiers is still a major center of the Paris Jewish community, which has made a renewal since the 1990s. Public notices announce Jewish events, bookshops specialize in Jewish books, and numerous restaurants and other outlets sell kosher food. The synagogue on 10 rue Pavée is not far from rue des Rosiers. It was designed in 1913 by Art Nouveau architect Hector Guimard, who designed several Paris Metro stations. Post-war rehabilitation [edit] By the 1950s, the district had become a working-class area and most of its architectural masterpieces were in a bad state of repair. In 1964, General de Gaulle's Andre Malraux made the Marais the first secteur sauvegardé (literally safeguarded sector). These were meant to protect and conserve places of special cultural significance. The following decades, the government and the Parisian municipality have led an active restoration and Rehabilitation Policy. The main Hôtels particuliers have been restored and turned into museums: the Hôtel Salé hosts the Picasso Museum, the Hôtel Carnavalet hosts the Paris Historical Museum, the Hôtel Donon hosts the Cognac-Jay Museum etc. The site of Beaubourg, the western part of Marais, was chosen for the Centre Georges Pompidou, France's national Museum of Modern Art and one of the world's most important cultural institutions. The building was completed in 1977 with revolutionary architecture by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers. Today's Marais[edit] The Marais is now one of Paris' main localities for art galleries. Following its rehabilitation, the Marais has become a fashionable district, home to many trendy restaurants, fashion houses, and hype galleries. The neighbourhood has experienced a growing gay presence since the 1980s, as evidenced by the existence of many gay cafés, nightclubs, cabarets and shops. These establishments are mainly concentrated in the southwestern portion of the Marais, many on or near the streets Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie and rue des Archives. The Marais is also known for the Chinese community it hosts. The community began to appear during World War I. At that time, France needed workers to replace its at-war soldiers and China decided to send a few thousand of its citizens on the condition that they would not take part of the war. After the 1918 victory, some of them decided to stay in Paris, specifically living around the current rue au Maire. Today, most work in jewelery and leather-related products. The Marais' Chinese community has settled in the north of the district, particularly in the surrounding of Place de la République. Next to it, on the rue du Temple, is the Chinese Church of Paris. Other features of the neighbourhood include the Musée Picasso, the house of Nicolas Flamel, the Musée Cognacq-Jay, the Musée Carnavalet and the new and very popular Café Charlot. .............and more
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CHARMING APPARTMENT IN THE HISTORIC MARAIS ! ! !

C'est un charmant studio situé dans l cœur du marais.

Vous pourrez ainsi vivre comme un parisien et profiter des petites boutiques de quartier.

Il a été récemment rénové, très spacieux et fonctionnel et surtout moderne.

Il est entièrement équipé et dispose ainsi de tout ce dont vous avez besoin.

Vous avez à votre disposition :

- machine à laver et sèche linge
- réfrigérateur
- micro onde
- Cuisine
- internet

Quartier :

Métro : Hôtel de Ville

Pour la petite histoire :

Le Marais est un quartier parisien historique (et non administratif), situé dans une partie des 3e et 4e arrondissements de Paris, sur la rive droite de la Seine. Il est aujourd'hui délimité à l'ouest par la rue Beaubourg, à l'est par le boulevard Beaumarchais, au nord par la rue de Bretagne et au sud par la Seine.
Le Marais est une ancienne zone de marécages occupée depuis le xiie siècle par des ordres religieux parmi lesquels l'ordre du Temple, qui y installent des établissements. Au début du xviie siècle, à la suite de la construction de la place des Vosges, ce quartier, jusque-là périphérique, devient le lieu de résidence de la noblesse parisienne. De nombreux hôtels particuliers y sont construits dont beaucoup subsistent aujourd'hui. Au milieu du xviiie siècle le quartier est déserté par l'élite parisienne au profit du faubourg Saint-Honoré et du faubourg Saint-Germain qui offrent plus d'espace. La Révolution française achève de chasser les propriétaires fortunés. Le quartier est dès lors occupé par une population d'artisans et d'ouvriers qui occupe les anciens hôtels et construit des ateliers dans les anciennes cours intérieures.
Les grands travaux d'aménagements de Paris du xixe siècle touchent peu le quartier qui conserve ses rues étroites, mais de nombreux immeubles de qualité sont progressivement détruits. En 1969, André Malraux lance un programme de sauvegarde et de préservation qui se poursuit encore aujourd'hui. Le quartier préservé est désormais, grâce à ses beaux immeubles, fréquenté par les touristes et recherché par les classes aisées. De nombreux musées y sont installés.
Plusieurs communautés s'y sont constituées au cours des années : juifs ashkénazes à la fin du xixe siècle, Chinois après la Première Guerre mondiale, et homosexuels.

History :

Paris aristocratic district
In 1240 the Order of the Temple built its fortified church just outside Paris's walls, in the northern part of the Marais. The Temple turned the district into an attractive area, and many religious institutions were built nearby: the des Blancs-Manteaux, de Sainte-Croix-de-la-Bretonnerie and des Carmes-Billettes convents, as well as the church of Sainte-Catherine-du-Val-des-Écoliers.
During the mid-13th century, Charles I of Anjou, King of Naples and Sicily, and brother of King Louis IX of France built his residence near the current n°7 rue de Sévigné.[1] In 1361 the King Charles V built a mansion known as the Hôtel Saint-Pol in which the Royal Court settled during his reign as well as his son's.
From that time to the 17th century and especially after the Royal Square (Place Royale, current place des Vosges) was designed under King Henri IV in 1605, the Marais was the French nobility's favorite place of residence. French nobles built their urban mansions there[2] such as the Hôtel de Sens, the Hôtel de Sully, the Hôtel de Beauvais, the Hôtel Carnavalet, the Hôtel de Guénégaud, and the Hôtel de Soubise.
Jewish community[edit]
After the nobility started to move to the Faubourg Saint-Germain, the district became a popular and active commercial area, hosting one of Paris' main Jewish communities. At the end of the 19th century and during the first half of the 20th, the district around the rue des Rosiers, referred to as the "Pletzl", welcomed many Eastern European Jews (Ashkenazi) who reinforced the district's clothing specialization. But, during World War II the Jewish community was targeted by the Nazis who were occupying France.
The rue des Rosiers is still a major centre of the Paris Jewish community, which has made a renewal since the 1990s. Public notices announce Jewish events, bookshops specialize in Jewish books, and numerous restaurants and other outlets sell kosher food.
The synagogue on 10 rue Pavée is not far from rue des Rosiers. It was designed in 1913 by Art Nouveau architect Hector Guimard, who designed several Paris Metro stations.
Post-war rehabilitation[edit]
By the 1950s, the district had become a working-class area and most of its architectural masterpieces were in a bad state of repair. In 1964, General de Gaulle's Culture Minister Andre Malraux made the Marais the first secteur sauvegardé (literally safeguarded sector). These were meant to protect and conserve places of special cultural significance. The following decades, the government and the Parisian municipality have led an active restoration and Rehabilitation Policy.
The main Hôtels particuliers have been restored and turned into museums: the Hôtel Salé hosts the Picasso Museum, the Hôtel Carnavalet hosts the Paris Historical Museum, the Hôtel Donon hosts the Cognac-Jay Museum etc. The site of Beaubourg, the western part of Marais, was chosen for the Centre Georges Pompidou, France's national Museum of Modern Art and one of the world's most important cultural institutions. The building was completed in 1977 with revolutionary architecture by Renzo Piano and Richard Rogers.
Today's Marais[edit]
The Marais is now one of Paris' main localities for art galleries. Following its rehabilitation, the Marais has become a fashionable district, home to many trendy restaurants, fashion houses, and hype galleries.
The neighbourhood has experienced a growing gay presence since the 1980s, as evidenced by the existence of many gay cafés, nightclubs, cabarets and shops. These establishments are mainly concentrated in the southwestern portion of the Marais, many on or near the streets Sainte-Croix de la Bretonnerie and rue des Archives.
The Marais is also known for the Chinese community it hosts. The community began to appear during World War I. At that time, France needed workers to replace its at-war soldiers and China decided to send a few thousand of its citizens on the condition that they would not take part of the war. After the 1918 victory, some of them decided to stay in Paris, specifically living around the current rue au Maire. Today, most work in jewelery and leather-related products. The Marais' Chinese community has settled in the north of the district, particularly in the surrounding of Place de la République. Next to it, on the rue du Temple, is the Chinese Church of Paris.
Other features of the neighbourhood include the Musée Picasso, the house of Nicolas Flamel, the Musée Cognacq-Jay, the Musée Carnavalet and the new and very popular Café Charlot.

.............and more

Amenities
Pets allowed
Wireless Internet
Kitchen
Dryer
House Rules
Check-in is anytime after 2PM
Check out by 11AM

The Check in it s 14h
The Check out 11h
Best regards
Karl

You must also acknowledge
Must climb stairs
Cancellations

148 Reviews

Accuracy
Communication
Cleanliness
Location
Check In
Value
Kate User Profile
September 2015
Great location and lovely little apartment. Karl's instructions were very good too!

Toni User Profile
October 2014
We stayed at Karl's apartment for four nights recently. The apartment was clean and tidy and in such an amazing location. The stairs are rather difficult to navigate with heavy suitcases but once you've actually got your bags to your room the stairs aren't a chore to use daily. We did end up putting the mattress off the sofa bed on the floor as the bed was incredibly squeaky and every time you moved it creaked. There is a small fridge in the apartment where you can put drinks or food and we cooked in the apartment a few times, but mostly are out as you are so close to so many great restaurants. Notre dame is incredibly close and there is a metro station a two minute walk from the apartment which will take you anywhere you need to go. Karl was s fantastic host, always checking we were okay and even letting us stay after check out as we had an incredibly late flight. I would definitely stay in Karl's apartment again and recommend it to anyone going to Paris.

John User Profile
November 2017
Disappointed as the place needs some cleaning. There is stuff in most drawers and so, little place for packing your own stuff. Bed not comfortable. Great location & good communication.

Elizabeth User Profile
November 2017
This tiny apartment was in a fantastic area and so close to transit and several great attractions. We had issues with the Wi-Fi when we first arrived, and Karl worked really hard to get the issue fixed as quickly as possible! We would definitely stay here again.

Nick User Profile
October 2017
Staying at Karl's place was the best experience I've had so far though Airbnb. The flat is perfectly located, I had zero experience with the Paris metro system and had no problem getting to places all over the city. This flat is simply amazing and Karl is a great host. Great for the price, if you need a place in Paris do yourself a favor and book this flat.

Kaitlin User Profile
October 2017
The apartment was located in a very convenient location. Only a 2 min walk to the metro station, lots of great local places to eat, and a quick walk to other neighborhoods to check out. The space was very clean and comfortable. Definitely a great place to stay.

Roberta User Profile
October 2017
Location - perfect location to experience the local Parisian life. Apartment condition - The apartment is the same as pictures - clean and neat. Both kitchen and bathroom are in good conditions. And strong water pressure for the shower is definitely a plus. Host - Karl is very responsive and the check-in process was straight forward. Minor minuses: -- The bed is a pull out sofa bed so it is not for everyone. -- The apartment is on the 3rd floor - it could be challenging for some, especially when handling a lot of of luggage

Paris, FranceJoined in October 2012
Karl User Profile
Chére Madame, Cher Monsieur, Je suis souvent en déplacement professionnel, mon appartement étant disponible je le loue à la semaine ou au mois. En esperant vous accueillir prochainement. Bien à vous.
Response rate: 100%
Response time: within an hour

The neighbourhood

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